ADVANCED EXERCISES FOR BACK PAIN

SUITABLE FOR EVERYONE

You should not attempt the advanced movements until you have partially mobilised (or decompressed) your lower spine. In order to do this, you will need to perform the Basic Exercises for at least three months. During this time, the Backrack should be used on a regular basis (3-4 times a week), for at least 20 minutes per session.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Before using the Backrack™ please read the following information carefully. In general, the Backrack™ can be used by anyone. However, the Backrack™ should not be used if you have one of the following conditions:

  • A vertebral fracture (that is not healed).
  • Severe scoliosis (Cobb angle > 45°).
  • A malignant, spinal tumour.
  • A spinal infection (e.g. meningitis).

To read even more detailed instructions on how to perform each one of these exercises, click on the headline of each exercise (highlighted in blue).

Without further ado, the advanced movements are as follows:

The advanced version of the double leg raise is performed similarly to the basic one, but with a variation (please refer to the Basic Exercises for more detail). This exercise will apply maximum pressure to your lumbar spine..

Just like with a regular double leg raise, lift both legs at the same time. However, instead of grabbing your knees and holding a central position, tilt your body to one side, so that your balance is shifted to either the left or the right side of your spine while you keep your legs close to your chest. Hold this tilted position for 30 seconds. If you can, bring your knees closer to your chest at this point.

Return back to the starting position.

Also please make sure that you grasp each leg behind the knee.

This exercise will strengthen the deep, abdominal muscles that stabilise the spine. Moderate pressure is applied to the lower back. To read the full description on how to perform this exercise, click on the headline of this section.

The lean back with tilt exercise applies maximum pressure to the mid-upper back, or thoracic spine. It requires a certain amount of strength and flexibility from your abdominal muscles; for this reason, we recommend that you feel comfortable with the Stomach Crunch before you attempt this manoeuvre.

To perform this exercise place yourself higher on the rack, as shown in the picture. Next, put your hands behind your head and lean back into the upper curve of the rack. This will increase the pressure on your thoracic spine.

After holding this position for a short period of time (perhaps 30 seconds), roll down the rack a short distance. This will allow you to target the next vertebra along your back. Again, hold for 30 seconds and repeat until the pressure on your spine begins to fade (or until you feel your abdominal muscles tiring).

You can increase the pressure still further by tilting over to one side. This will shift your weight onto one side of your upper spine.

Also, please make sure that you breathe throughout the entire exercise and do not tense your neck or over-arch your lower back.

Finally, the Reverse Leg Raise is the last exercise that we’ll be covering in this section. Reverse leg raises strengthen the lower back muscles. They are actually performed without the use of the Backrack™, but it will help to strengthen your spine and prevent further injury. They will also help to balance the strength of your abdominal muscles (developed using the Stomach Crunch).

Because these exercises require a certain amount of strength and flexibility from your abdominal muscles, we recommend that you feel comfortable with the Stomach Crunch before you attempt this manoeuvre.

You should not attempt this exercise until you have mobilised (or decompressed) your lower spine. You will need to use the Backrack™ in order to do this. When your back is sufficiently decompressed, you should have little or no back pain, and you should be reasonably flexible.

Do not attempt the exercise until you have used the Backrack™ on a regular basis for at least three months. If you are in any doubt as to whether this exercise is appropriate for you, please consult your doctor.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

All movements for the back should be carried out while lying down. Before you attempt any of the individual movements, we recommend that you read the section on Flexibility.

Full details for use of the Backrack™ are contained in our Instruction Manual (PDF document).

Once again, before you use the Backrack™ please make sure that you do not suffer from any of the following contraindications:

  • A vertebral fracture (that is not healed).
  • Severe scoliosis (Cobb angle > 45°).
  • A malignant, spinal tumour.
  • A spinal infection (e.g. meningitis)

Lastly, to read even more detailed instructions on how to perform each one of these exercises, click on the headline of each exercise (highlighted in blue).